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Re: I am finding this hard to believe. Mesquito,moths,flies. gov't is aiming to kill...and if Americans die too. Americans are to understand that a vacine will heal the problem.
 
Twinkle Fingers Views: 3,091
Published: 13 years ago
 
This is a reply to # 1,186,602

Re: I am finding this hard to believe. Mesquito,moths,flies. gov't is aiming to kill...and if Americans die too. Americans are to understand that a vacine will heal the problem.


The gov't do not care if all Americans must suffer...SO BE IT!
HOW ABOUT WASHINGTON. HOW ABOUT SPRAYING OVER ALL THE SENATORS' HOUSES AND BUSHS'
RANCH AND ALL THE SNAKES INVOLVED DOING THIS?

I HEARD ONLY ONE TOWN HERE ONE TOWN THERE IS SPRAYING MESQUITOES AND THE WEST NILE
VIRUS. THEY LOVE TO KEEP US ALL IN THE DARK. WHO PAYS FOR ALL THE MEDS HILARY'S
PLAN?

News Tips
News ~ News Tips ~ In the News ~ Related News


* Come on In, the Water's Fine--for Mosquitoes (UC ANR News Tip: June 29, 2007) new
* Heat Can Play Havoc With Forensic Science (UC ANR News Tip: June 29, 2007) new
* Fire-Damaged Wood Can Have Insects Coming out of the Walls (UC ANR News Tip: June 23, 2007)
* Taking the Bite Out of Mother's Day (UC ANR News Tip: May 4, 2007) new
* Link Between Global Warming and Transmission of West Nile Virus (April 10, 2007)
* Fear Factor's Hissing Cockroaches Now Live at Bohart Museum (UC Davis News Tip: Nov. 3, 2006)
* World Food Day (UC ANR News Tip: Oct. 10, 2006)
* Fight the Light (UC ANR News Tip: Aug. 28, 2006)
* Cold-Blooded Mosquitoes Love the Heat (UC ANR News Tip: July 12, 2006)
* Volunteers Sort Insects on Sort Night (UC ANR News Tip: May 17, 2006)
* Another Reason Why Every Litter Bit Hurts (UC ANR News Tip: April 22, 2006)
* UC Davis Experts from UC Mosquito Research Program, UC Davis Center for Vectorborne Diseases, on West Nile Virus (March 23, 2006)
* UC Davis Campuswide Experts on West Nile Virus, Mosquito-Borne Diseases (March 23, 2006)
* Entomologists Target Malaria in Mali (March 6, 2006)
* Understanding Malaria Mosquito's Sense of Smell (Jan. 11, 2006)
* UC Researchers Target Mosquitoes That Carry West Nile Virus (Dec. 8, 2005)

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UC ANR News Tip
June 29, 2007

Come on in, the water’s fine — for mosquitoes
Rains, followed by warmer temperatures, equal perfect weather conditions for Culex mosquitoes and the threat of West Nile virus transmission, says UC Davis medical entomologist and mosquito researcher Anthony Cornel, based at the Kearney Research and Extension Center near Parlier. “We need to take extra precautions this time of year in California when the weather heats up and West Nile virus transmission increases,” he says. “Mosquito immature stages grow faster in warm water and viruses replicate faster in adult mosquitoes in higher ambient temperatures.” Mosquitoes that transmit diseases feed primarily at dawn and dusk. Cornel recommends staying inside when mosquitoes are most active. If you must be outside, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants, and apply an effective repellant, such as DEET. It’s crucial to eliminate standing water around the home and to report all dead birds and tree squirrels to 1-877-WNV-BIRD (1-877-968-2473). Last year California recorded 276 human cases of West Nile Virus and seven fatalities. Kern County led with 49 infections, followed by Butte with 31 and Yolo with 27. The fatalities occurred in Butte, Contra Costa, Fresno, Riverside and Shasta. In all, 54 of the state’s 58 counties reported West Nile Virus activity (http://westnile.ca.gov/). For more information contact Cornel at (559) 646-6581, cornel@uckac.edu. Tip by Kathy Keatley Garvey, (530) 754-6894, kegarvey@ucdavis.edu.

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UC ANR News Tip
June 29, 2007

Heat can play havoc with forensic science
Extreme climatic conditions, such as heat waves, can alter the pattern of insect-aided human decomposition, but forensic entomologists must also take into account whether the remains were initially in an area restricted to insect access and then moved, says UC Davis forensic entomologist Robert Kimsey. “In the process of normal decomposition in summer, where insect access is not restricted, all but about 30 to 40 percent of the living weight of a decedent leaves as wandering fly maggots in about the first two weeks,” he explains. “At about this point, dermestid beetle larvae usually come to dominate the insect fauna on the desiccating remains, in part because beetle larvae take very much longer to develop than fly maggots.” However, he said, two recent cases of relatively desiccated remains showed about 70 to 80 percent of the living weight still present. Each of these cases occurred “subsequent to an extended heat wave where temperatures exceed 100 degrees for some number of days,” Kimsey said. High temperatures may suppress blow fly activity and increase the rate of drying. “In the lab, dermestid beetle larvae can use remains in any state of decomposition; under field conditions they do not become obvious until after maggots, for the most part, have left, suggesting competitive exclusion.” In determining the time of death, forensic entomologists must also take into account whether the remains were initially in an area restricted to insect access and then moved. For more information, contact Robert Kimsey at rbkimsey@ucdavis.edu, (530) 752-1597. Tip by Kathy Keatley Garvey, kegarvey@ucdavis.edu, (530) 754-6894.

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UC ANR News Tip
June 23, 2007

Fire-damaged wood can have insects coming out of the walls
Forest fires can have “downstream consequences” when salvaged trees, infested with wood-boring insects, are processed into lumber and then used in new home and business construction, says Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University of California, Davis. The low-grade lumber usually doesn’t warrant kiln-drying or vacuum fumigation so the insects remain. “Insects such as horntails literally come out of the walls,” Kimsey said. The horntails – wood wasps that measure one to two inches long and buzz loudly – are especially disconcerting. “We get calls about them from worried homeowners asking what they are and what they can do.” It all begins when a female wood wasp lays her eggs in a fire-ravaged or weakened tree, usually a conifer. Eggs hatch in three to four weeks into larvae, which tunnel deep into the wood. It takes from two to five years to complete the life cycle, from egg to larva to adult. The end result: a horntail emerges from a 1/4 to 1/2 inch-diameter hole, alarming the two-legged occupants of the home. “The horntails look scary and may cause aesthetic damage,” Kimsey said, “but they are not harmful. They do not bite or sting.” And, once they emerge, they do not reinfest or attack harvested lumber. The Bohart Museum, home of some 7 million insect specimens collected from around the world, fields calls about insects. For more information, contact Lynn Kimsey at (530) 752-5353, lskimsey@ucdavis.edu. Tip by Kathy Keatley Garvey, (530) 754-6894, kegarvey@ucdavis.edu

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UC ANR News Tip
May 4, 2007

Taking the Bite Out of Mother's Day
Mother’s Day traditionally means a patio party, and it’s the perfect time to give potted plants as gifts. But the saucers underneath the potted plants can harbor mosquitoes if you allow the water to pool. A six-inch saucer can produce as many as 1,000 mosquitoes a week, according to UC Davis medical entomologist Gregory Lanzaro, director of the UC Mosquito Research Program. California is home to approximately 50 species of mosquitoes, but only the females are bloodfeeders. They need a blood meal to develop their eggs. Don’t let Mom become an involuntary blood donor. To prevent mosquito bites, avoid being outdoors at dusk or dawn when mosquitoes are most active. “If Mom needs to be outdoors at this time, she should wear a long-sleeved shirt and pants and apply repellant,” Lanzaro said. Be sure to drain all standing water on your property. For more information on mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases, contact Lanzaro at (530) 752-5652 or gclanzaro@ucdavis.edu. Tip by Kathy Keatley Garvey at (530) 754-6894, kegarvey@ucdavis.edu.

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UC ANR News Tip
April 10, 2007

Link between global warming and transmission of West Nile Virus
There’s a definite link between global warming and the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases, such as West Nile virus, says research entomologist William Reisen of the Center for Vectorborne Diseases at UC Davis. Mosquitoes are coldblooded and their temperature is similar to that of their environment, he explains. “Therefore, environmental temperatures play a critical role in establishing when (during the year) and where (geographically) that vector-borne diseases amplify to epidemic levels. This, in turn, enables parasite acquisition and transmission.” In addition, parasites develop faster within the vectors (mosquitoes) and can be transmitted earlier in vector life and more frequently during warm periods. “Global warming will enhance these processes by extending transmission seasons to more months during the year and parasite distributions into colder latitudes,” Reisen says, pointing out that West Nile virus epidemics in northern United States and Canada “have clearly occurred during summers with above normal temperatures and subsided during cool summers.” Female mosquitoes “bite” because they require a blood meal to develop their eggs. “They’re not flying needles; they’re biological vectors,” he says. Species of Culex mosquitoes that transmit West Nile virus are found on every continent except Antarctica. For more information, contact Reisen at (530) 752-0124, wkreisen@ucdavis.edu. Tip by Kathy Keatley Garvey, kegarvey@ucdavis.edu or (530) 754-6894.

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Fear Factor's Hissing Cockroaches Now Live at Bohart Museum
UC Davis News Tip
Nov. 3, 2006
Madagascar hissing cockroaches
Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis' Bohart Museum of Entomology has television's "Fear Factor" to thank. Some 30-40 Madagascar hissing cockroaches, left over from one of the show's outrageous stunts, were passed on last year to the museum, and now make up part of its 30-year-old hissing cockroach collection.

The hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa), are native to the island of Madagascar off the coast of Africa. They are among the world's largest roaches, measuring two to three inches long and an inch wide -- about the size of a small mouse.

In the forest, they live in rotting logs, feeding on fallen fruit and fecal matter. At the Bohart Museum, the "hissers" dine on fruits and vegetables, preferring apples, lettuce and yams.

For people considering keeping roaches for pets, the Madagascan cockroaches are easy to care for.

"You just add food and you get more," says entomologist Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum. "They move slowly, are docile, emit little or no odor, and do not bite."

The Madagascan roaches hiss defensively when disrupted or threatened, by forcing air through a pair of modified abdominal spiracles, or pores, which are part of their respiratory system. Male roaches also hiss during courtship and mating.

Cockroaches are considered "living fossils" because they have survived on Earth some 250 million years, appearing long before dinosaurs. More than 3,500 species of cockroaches exist today.

The Bohart Museum, founded in 1946, houses some 7 million specimens in its worldwide collection, which focuses on terrestrial and freshwater invertebrates. It also is home to the California Insect Survey, a storehouse of the insect biodiversity of California's deserts, mountains, coast and Central Valley.

The museum is open weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m.
Group tours can be arranged with senior museum scientist Steve Heydon at (530) 752-0493 or by e-mailing the museum at bmuseum@ucdavis.edu.

The museum's Web site is at
http://bohart.ucdavis.edu.


Media contact(s):
* Lynn Kimsey, Bohart Museum, (530) 752-5373, skimsey@ucdavis.edu
* Kathy Keatley Garvey, Entomology, (530) 754-6894, kegarvey@ucdavis.edu
* Pat Bailey, UC Davis News Service, (530) 752-9843, pjbailey@ucdavis.edu

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Fight the Light
UC ANR News Tip
Aug. 28, 2006
Sharon Lawler
Sharon Lawler
(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mosquito researchers are known for "fighting the bite"—or protecting the public from mosquito-borne diseases like West Nile virus—and one way you can do this and save energy is by "fighting the light." Sharon Lawler, UC Davis associate professor of entomology, says Culex mosquitoes, which transmit the West Nile virus, are attracted to lights, especially bright lights. Female mosquitoes usually blood-feed at dawn and dusk; they require blood meals to develop their eggs. Turning off unnecessary lighting in your yard at dusk and dawn can help two ways: you can reduce your chances of being bitten by mosquitoes that may migrate in from surrounding areas, and you can also save energy. You should also replace your porch lights with yellow "bug" lights, which tend to attract fewer mosquitoes, Lawler says. In addition to lights, Culex mosquitoes are attracted by heat (infrared light), perspiration, Body Odor , lactic acid and carbon dioxide. Like many researchers, Lawler commonly uses light traps in adult mosquito surveillance. The energy-conscious researcher (she commutes to work by bike, a 10-mile round trip) also offers these energy-saving tips: turn off the lights in windowed rooms and use the natural light; close off the air conditioning duct in the guest room or rooms not being used; and close the blinds during the day and open the windows at night to let the breezes flow through. And, be sure your windows have tight-fitting, intact screens, she cautions. For more information, contact Lawler at (530) 754-8341, splawler@ucdavis.edu. Tip by Kathy Keatley Garvey, (530) 754-6894, kegarvey@ucdavis.edu.

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Cold-Blooded Mosquitoes Love the Heat
UC ANR News Tip
July 12, 2006
Bill Reisen
William Reisen
(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mosquitoes are cold-blooded and therefore love hot weather, says UC Davis research entomologist and professor William Reisen of the Center for Vectorborne Diseases. Hot weather speeds up their metabolism, so they feed on blood and lay their eggs more frequently. Bottom line: hotter weather increases the odds for female mosquitoes to become infected with the West Nile virus (WNV) and to transmit it the next time they bite. Culex mosquitoes, the principal carriers of WNV, are most active around sunset, Reisen says. Culex tarsalis feed near sunset, whereas Culex pipiens usually feed two to three hours after sunset. “You can avoid mosquitoes during those times by going into your air-conditioned home, turning on the TV and drinking a cold beer,” he quipped. “If you don’t have to be outside after sunset when the mosquitoes are biting, don’t. If you do, cover up by wearing a long-sleeved shirt and long pants, and spray any exposed skin with DEET.” Particularly at high-risk after sunset are smokers, who often are relegated outdoors to smoke. For more information, contact Reisen at (530) 752-0124 or arbo123@pacbell.net. Tip by Kathy Keatley Garvey (530) 754-6894, kegarvey@ucdavis.edu.

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Volunteers Sort Insects on Sort Night
UC ANR News Tip
May 17, 2006
Lynn Kimsey
Lynn Kimsey
(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Volunteers gather once a month at the R.M. Bohart Museum of Entomology at UC Davis to identify, sort, pin and label insects for display. "We've been doing this off and on for about 20 years," said Bohart director Lynn Kimsey, a professor of entomology at UC Davis. "Newcomers may feel overwhelmed at first, but this is a good, gregarious group and we make them feel at home." Besides the assorted insects, Sort Night usually draws from 10 to 30 people. "We always have four to six people from the California Department of Food and Agriculture to help--to sort insects to species," she said. The next Sort Night is from 6 to 10 p.m., Wednesday, June 7. Food and beverages are provided. The Bohart Museum, founded in 1946, is dedicated to teaching, research and service, and houses some 7 million specimens in its worldwide collection. The collection focuses on terrestrial and fresh water invertebrates and is home to the California Insect Survey, a storehouse of the insect biodiversity of California's deserts, mountains, coast and central valley. For more information, contact Lynn Kimsey, (530) 752-5373, lskimsey@ucdavis.edu. The Web site is at
http://bohart.ucdavis.edu.
Tip by Kathy Keatley Garvey, (530) 754-6894, kegarvey@ucdavis.edu.

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Mosquito breeding in jarsEarth Day
UC ANR News Tip
April 22, 2006
Another Reason Why Every Litter Bit Hurts
Removing standing water from winter storms is crucial to controlling the mosquito population, and subsequently the mosquito-borne disease West Nile virus, which last year killed 18 people in California and infected more than 900 others, says medical entomologist Gregory Lanzaro, director of the UC Mosquito Research Program and director of the UC Davis Center for Vectorborne Diseases. Female mosquitoes are looking for water to lay their eggs and they easily find it in bottles, cans, tires and other litter strewn along freeways and roads or tossed into bodies of water. Residents can do their part by emptying or turning over anything that holds water in their yards, maintaining pools and spas, adding mosquitofish to ponds and flushing out bird baths and fountains at least once a week. A female mosquito can lay about 250 eggs during her life span, which averages about a month, Lanzaro said. The Culex mosquito is the principal carrier or vector of West Nile virus. For more information, contact Lanzaro at (530) 752-5652, gclanzaro@ucdavis.edu. Tip by Kathy Keatley Garvey, (530) 754-6894, kegarvey@ucdavis.edu.

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University of California, Davis
Jan. 11, 2006
Science, Engineering and Technology News Tips

Understanding Malaria Mosquito's Sense of Smell

Anopheles gambiae, the mosquito that is the main carrier of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa, finds its human food largely by scent. Now UC Davis researchers have discovered the crystal structure of a key component in the insect's sense of smell.

Insects smell through their antennae. When airborne scent molecules enter the antennae, they are picked up by specialized odorant-binding proteins and carried across a water barrier to the sensory cells, where they are released, said Walter Leal, professor of entomology at UC Davis.

"We can use the structure of the binding protein to find the compounds that it picks up, because we want to find chemicals that are attractants or repellents for mosquitoes," Leal said.

X-ray studies by graduate student Mark Wogulis and associate professor David Wilson of the Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology show that AgamOPB1, a protein identified in the mosquito by Leal's research group, forms pairs, or dimers, with a single long tunnel running through the middle of the complex to hold scent molecules.

"That's something we've not seen before in this class of proteins," Wilson said. The small number of other odorant-binding proteins whose structure is known, from bees, cockroaches and moths, have a smaller pocket or fold to pick up scent molecules.

The group's studies showed that a drop in pH causes the mosquito protein to change shape, opening the tunnel and releasing whatever molecule it is carrying. Other known odorant-binding proteins show a similar pH-dependent mechanism, Leal said.

The researchers will now try to identify the target molecule for AgamOPB1, by crystallizing the protein with its natural ligand.

Wogulis has a special interest in malaria, having served in the Peace Corps as a teacher in Africa.

"There was a lot of malaria about. Malaria season would come, and students would be absent sick," he said.

Other authors on the paper are Tania Morgan and Yukio Ishida of the Department of Entomology. The research is published in the Jan. 6 issue of Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications.
 

 
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